Getting Back to Old Fashioned Health Values

Attaining optimal physical health in the year 2018 is probably a little bit confusing. Do short-cuts exist? Can you hack a boost with a magical coffee and fasting for 3 days? Is there a wonder food? Is there one exercise that’ll do the job and is strength training all you need to lead a wonderful and fulfilling life allowing you to thrive into old age with grace and all your human facets in place?

If anyone tells you ‘just need ____’, they are most likely full of cr@p!

To get a grasp of how and what is means to lead an optimally, healthy life as a human, you need to grasp what it means to be an optimally, healthy human. What is our system designed to do?

Thankfully the impartial and unbiased side of the medical and sports science world has outlined this for us on numerous occasions. We’ll delve into this later on.

For the purposes of physical health, strength, wellbeing and seeing results from training, I like to focus on the following areas:

  • Recovery
  • Nutrition
  • Cardiovascular exercise
  • Resistance exercise
  • Movement practice

Here’s a wee infographic I’m working on. Eventually it will have links to resources for each area.

Screen Shot 2018-09-20 at 1.04.21 pm

For a very long time (until recently) people have included the above ‘agenda’ in their lives out of lifestyle necessity.

Until the 1950s and 1960s people had lifestyles that promoted:

  • moving more than sitting,
  • activities that kept them strong,
  • eating mostly unprocessed foods,
  • sleeping a good 7 to 8 hours rather than binge watching TV until they fell asleep.

Standards and values of basic human performance have dropped dramatically. Waist inches have climbed and even though we are living longer, we are just delaying death rather than prolonging life. Let’s read that last sentence again.

Waist inches have climbed and even though we are living longer, we are just delaying death rather than prolonging life.

There is no doubt that we will never return to a lifestyle that demands more physical living unless war and famine dictates it!

If you value old fashioned physical standards of health, attaining a good balance of physical living, what do you need to do?

At the start of the blog I mentioned that medical and sport science has informed us what we need to do. Let’s recap on what is promoted:

Sleep: 7 – 8 hours is optimal despite the fact that some people tell you that 5 hours is all they need.

Nutrition: No diets are required. Just aim to gradually reduce processed foods and meals and snacks and instead target fruits and vegetables that are in season NOW. Three to four fist sized portions a day. Eat unprocessed sources of protein, roughly the same size of 2 to 3 palm sizes. Eat unprocessed (read – natural) sources of carbohydrates like rice, potatoes and other root vegetables. Roughly 2 to 3 palm fulls a day. More information from Precision Nutrition. 

Cardiovascular: The targets have been made clear. Walk 30 to 90 minutes a day. You do not have to get seriously out breath, just get up and walk for at least 30 accumulated minutes a day. Simple really. Once this standard is met, then an additional 2 higher intensity sessions can be added a week – 30 minutes of effort that take you pulse to 180 – your age. Not flat-out death chasing stuff! Read more here.

Resistance Training: Two to three times a week undertake a strength training program that includes all the essential human movements. These are the most common physical movements we are required to perform and designed to perform frequently. These can be labelled as Squatting, Pushing, Pulling, Bracing (our torso), Hinging / Bending at the hips and Carrying weight. A well structured plan can be simple and undertaken in as little as 20 to 30 minutes. Need a hand, just ask.

Movement Practice: This is probably one area that should increase compared to strength training as we age. As a goal now, if you spend 30 minutes strength training, you should spend up to an hour on a movement practice. What do I mean movement practice? Yoga, Animal Flow, Original Strength, whatever flexibility techniques you like but in any case, you gotta get looser. As we age our hips, biceps, chest, hamstrings and other areas develop and hold onto more tension due to fatigue, posture, lifestyle. Stretch, move – get all loosey-goosey.

Building this into a week as a beginner

  • Walk every day for 30 minutes (3.5 hours a week)
  • Strength Train twice a week for 30 minutes (1 hour a week)
  • Stretch / Get Mobile 4 times a week for 30 minutes (2 hours a week)
  • Start a habit of eating mostly natural foods
  • Sleep every day for 7 to 8 hours

Yes, you read that right. Exercising for 6 ½ hours is essential for a beginner. Any less and you really are leaving a lot on the table. Any less and your lifestyle will be underpowered to assist you into old age.

It’s a serious matter but think of it this way. Do you want to spend the final years of your life in assisted aged care, unable to clean your own bum or do you want to thrive until your dying day.

To quote Steve “Coach Fury” Holiner, ‘Live Long, Be Strong, Die Mighty’! 

I know I’ve laid out a handful of information here. If you want to start to thrive now and you’re not sure where to start, get in touch and I will happily steer you in the right direction. Not a sales pitch, I just want to help.

 

 

Diet Motivation?

So many people want to use exercise as their main tool to lose body fat. But in all honesty, exercise is a weak tool for this job. Yes it has it’s place but the priority is nutritional.

It’s a hard pill to swallow, that you might have to start paying attention to what you eat. But what if you could see the future? What if you could glance at your life once you achieve your goal?

One useful tool to help motivate you to start making changes is a ‘Visualisation’ exercise where you do just what the last sentence talks about.

Here’s some homework:

Write a note to yourself, from the perspective of when you’ve achieved your weight loss goal. Imagine how your life will be.

Don’t get too off-point, be specific. Here are a few questions you could answer.

  • How does your life differ?
  • Why has it been important to you that you’ve achieved your goal?
  • How are your relationships with friends, your partner, your family and colleagues?
  • How do you feel now as a person?

Once you’ve written your note, read it back to yourself. How does it make you feel? Do you have some ideas coming into your head about where to start and maybe which areas you’d like to start with? Have your values changed perhaps?

Any revelations – please do share below.

 

 

Featured image from Lego.

What to eat for performance and getting leaner?

Yes, what a topic to confuse everyone. The choices are numerous and every single ‘diet’ has one common theme – a total energy deficit. Whether it’s a low carb, high carb, high fat, high protein or whatever diet, there will always be a calorie deficit involved.

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So whilst change is hard, let’s keep the advice simple, and real.

If you really want to get those muscles strong and lean, any well structured program will deliver but only if your nutrition is dialled in.

A progressive strength program will run in phases to set you up, get you strong, then probably have a hiked up period of boosting your metabolism. To get these specific adaptations in the muscles we need to focus on a limited number of movements, perform them well and repeatably. 

To get a return of investment from your efforts and muscles the eating advice is clear:

If nature grew it out of the ground, off a bush or a tree, or it ran, flew or swam (plants and critters in other words) you eat it. Don’t be fearful of carbs – just keep them natural.

Here’s a wee list of what I find works the best to stay lean:

1. First off, cut added sugars. Seriously, if you want to drop excess weight, start with dropping the sugary stuff.

2. Replace the frequent starchy food for vegetables. Bread, potato, pasta – gone. More veg – in. This is especially important on non-exercising days.

3. Good news. You can eat your starchy carbs post exercise, but one portion, not a plate piled high with chips or pasta. 1 portion = a potato or a wrap or a palmful of rice.

4. Per day you will have to be sure to consume your proteins. Aim for non-processed protein sources and these can be non-meat plant based proteins if you prefer.

How much?

  • Men = 4 – 6 palm sized portions a day.
  • Ladies = 3 palm sized portion a day.

5. Eat HEAPS of of vegetables. I’ve said it before and I’m saying it again – to fill you up and to provide your body with oodles of nutrients and minerals, eat a variety of vegetables. Aim to have every colour represented every day. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower are great and versatile.

6. Water. This is Australia folks, we sweat. Replace those fluids and help your body flush out toxins by drinking around 8 glasses a day – or just more than you’re currently drinking. A great tip that has helped others is this. Every time you take a sip of water, take a second sip.

7. Last point. Don’t get hung up on recipes. Just prepare food and meals that you enjoy eating taking into consideration the points above.

 

My best advice is to take a week by week progression, much like the exercise component.

Week 1: How can you make breakfast (your first meal regardless of time) a little better. What can you prepare and eat easily without fuss? A quick omelette? Yoghurt with added berries and seeds? Boiled eggs? Experiment.

Week 2: The same process with Dinner. Maybe make a big dish that’ll last a couple of days, for lunch too. Like shredded pork? Cook up a shoulder overnight, and shred as needed – yum. How about a bolognese sauce that can be eaten with so many options? Fun and simple to prepare but make enough and it’ll last a few days.

Week 3: Maybe it’s time to hone in on the shopping list. Write a list that reflects the meals you like to prepare and eat and shop accordingly – that easy.

If you are not the main meal preparer – talk to who is about what you are trying to do and work with them. Support them as they help you.

You get the idea? Gradually try to implement the tips to progress your meals to good, better and betterer. I used to write ‘best’ as the final goal, but really, that’s unattainable in the real world.

Strive for continued better.

Any comments or advice or feedback – just get in touch below.

Top 10 List for Lasting Fat Loss

Fitness is not a counter to eating. Whilst strength training is a counter to weakness and eating is a counter to feeling hungry, fitness is not a counter for eating.

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I frequently hear such sentiments in conversations, social media posts and even on the TV / radio.

Someone will say something to the affect of, “I don’t do fitness; I like food too much”, or “follow this ‘X’ program to shed kilos of fat”, or worse still, “I’ve got to punish myself in the gym to work off that weekend”!

The latter is all too common and such a waste of good gym time, it’s stressful and pretty unproductive.

The most successful trainees I spend time with have these following in common:

  1. They follow a training program.
  2. They turn up to the gym when expected.
  3. They work on activities they find challenging (read, enjoyable).
  4. They develop skill and strength.
  5. They laugh and have fun.
  6. They don’t exercise to burn calories.
  7. They don’t exercise to punish themselves.

The ones who fail pretty much do the opposite of these 7 points. There’s another example of a ‘counter’.

When we turn to dropping some body fat, what does work?
For a start, it shouldn’t be hard, shouldn’t challenge us too much or overwhelm us.

Here’s a (short) list of 10 tips. 

#1 Focus on changing one dietary habit at a time.

The most successful changes happen not by stubborn drive, but by attentive focus on dealing with just one, reasonable item. Studies show that when more than two habit changes are targeted, failure ensues. However, when a person focuses on changing one habit they are drastically more likely to succeed. Why stack the odds against yourself with too many things to change when one change is going to be more successful? Picking something to change that you consider ‘reasonable’ is also stacking odds in your favour. If cutting back on carbs causes too much resistance – don’t do it. If eating a bit more chicken with your lunch seems reasonable – do it.

#2 Eat fewer calories.

Yeah I know, you’ve heard this before and yes, it makes total sense. What doesn’t make sense is cutting your daily energy intake by huge amounts or, drastically overnight. Arbitrary numbers too, is nonsensical. Stop just buying into a random number because an instagram ‘guru’ tells you it’s what you need. Many commercial products too, sell calorie based packages. There’s the 1200, 1300, 1750, 2000 calorie packages  – how do know these numbers relate to what you need?

The solution (to end my rant) is to simply look at what you’re eating, and decide what rationally could be reduced. By how much? A simple palmful size, that’s how much. Want to cut down on potato, well cut out a palmful amount of potato per day. Too much coke? Well, drop one can a day – that’s a reasonable starting point. You’d like to cut back on bread? How much? Yes, that’s right – whatever fits your palm size, a slice for example each day. These little acts of reasonable change will seem easy, and that’s cool. It’ll mean that change has a greater chance of succeeding and all those small drops will equate to reasonable drops in calories too. But, like #1, choose one item to work on.

#3 Check the quality of the carbs you eat.

It’s a sad reality that todays food options include far too much processed foodstuffs. What might seem and look like a fine, healthy product is probably packed with unnecessary sugars, flavour enhancers, salts, fats and a lot of stuff you may struggle to pronounce! Keep the carbs natural, as best you can, for most of the time. If it grew off of a plant, well, it’s safe to say it’s safe to eat. Got it?

#4 Eat your dam vegetables!

Talking of plants (#3), do you see evidence of them on your plates or in your wraps etc? Here’s the thing. When cutting back a little you’ll probably feel hard done by. You’ll be thinking you’re eating less and will more than likely stress a little. Hey, you’re human, it’s a thing. How do you deal with it? Eat more vegetables. They’ll make you feel fuller, increase the spectrum of healthy micro-nutrients and minerals, provide more fibre and make your poo slip out more easily! Eeeew, yes I went there!

How much? The experts over at Precision Nutrition suggest this:

Eat 1 cupful (thats probably the same as your palmful) of each group of vegetables a day.

  • that’s one cup of green veg
  • that’s one cup of purple veg
  • that’s one cup of red veg
  • that’s one cup of orange veg
  • that’s one cup of white veg

Here’s a cool infographic -> click me
or copy this -> http://www.precisionnutrition.com/color-chart

If this seems unreasonable, read #1 again. Start somewhere. It honestly doesn’t matter where, just start to make a change.

#5 Are you getting enough protein?

It’s hard to imagine with so much meat, chicken and fish etc in abundance in the grocery stores, but many people are eating insufficient protein. Before I offend any vegans and vegetarians reading, yes, protein can be sought from plant based sources too.
Ideally women should consume the equivalent of 3 palm sized portions of protein rich food per day. Men should consume the equivalent of 4-6 palm size portions of protein rich food per day.

Does it have to be in three meals? Nope. Does it have to be from animals? Nope. If you don’t eat animal based proteins I’m pretty sure you know where to get your proteins but do make sure you eat enough of it.

Why? Well, protein regenerates the cells we degenerate on a day to day basis. Proteins and amino acids (from proteins) are used by our bodies to produce important molecules like enzymes, hormones, neurotransmitters, and antibodies – without an adequate protein intake, our bodies can’t function well at all.

#6 Enjoy what you eat.

Okay, so we need cut a wee bit of the stuff we don’t need as much, we need to eat plenty of veg and sufficient proteins and fats but let’s not get bored eating the same ol same ol every day. Unless you enjoy that. 

And that is a huge factor of successful nutrition – we have to enjoy what we eat. This is one of many things that make us a special species – we get to enjoy what we eat. We socialise, laugh, have fun all while eating. The enjoyment factor is also why many ‘made for you’ meal plans or diet sheets fail. They don’t match our preferences. How do we get away with enjoying food whilst limiting things? Being reasonable of course. Yes, you can have pizza every now and then, but plan for it and don’t make it an every day meal. Like your plate of mashed potato, grilled salmon and sweet chilli vegetables? Well then, eat it. Maybe make the rational and reasonable decision to limit the serving of potato but still have the dam meal if you like it.

Here’s a great exercise: On some quite time make a list of all the meals you enjoy eating. Next, make reasonable changes to each meal that drives each meal closer to the recommendations above in regards to carbs, proteins and vegetables. It doesn’t need to be perfect, just better than before. Then, make a shopping list and go to town. After this the cooking is the second most fun part before eating.

#7 Walk more but stop the endless fixation with calorie burning cardio.

Numerous studies have shown how walking is great for us. It gets us up, moving, breathing and maybe socialising. Walking alone isn’t going to expend much energy (unless you’re into hiking 10-20km on a Sunday morning), so again, don’t label walking a counter to eating. Walking is just healthy. Walking is a catalyst to better health decisions in my humble opinion.

#8 Get stronger.

Most peoples ‘go-to’ when they are gripped by the notion to shed a few kgs, is to do ‘cardio’. They refer to walking, running, zipping along on the gyms elliptical trainer or spinning away on the bike. Okay, caveat here – yes, cardiovascular activities are great, can be fun and social too but, they are terrible at fat loss – unless you are committing yourself to hours of the stuff a week. Most of us do not have this luxury – do you?
Back in the 90s when my job was racing my bike, I would be spending 25 hours a week on the bike, ate like a race horse which I didn’t enjoy and yeah, my body fat was between 4-6% but I was young and fully accepted that eating that way sucked.
Do you have 20-25 hours a week to wear yourself out to lose a bit of fat? There are easier ways.

Now then, strength training develops metabolically hyped up muscles, much more so than the more gentler muscle contractions of cardiovascular activities. Simply put, stronger muscles use more energy at rest – that is to say, they burn more fat calories at rest than ‘cardio’. Strength training also has the added benefit of making everything else in life easier.

#9 Check your sleep health.

If someone asked me how to get fat without eating more – just hear me out – I’d tell them to sleep less and get stressed.

These two go hand-in-hand of course but, less sleep increases cortisol, the fat storing hormone. Some of us survive on 5-6 hours of sleep, but I’d rather not describe myself as just surviving – I want to be thriving. So, the general aims are 7-8 hours of sleep each night. Bed by 10pm?

#10 How much water are you drinking every day?

Our bodies comprise more than 60% water so you’d figure it’s a pretty important factor in good health, including maintaining a healthy body composition. I won’t go into all the health benefits or what water is used for in our bodies.
Many people just don’t drink enough water. Thirst is often misinterpreted as hunger and yep, the wrong stuff in consumed. Numerous studies (I know, so many studies!) have been conducted that show how an increase of water consumption increases metabolism, alertness, sense of wellbeing, better skin and yet again, make your poo slip out more easily! Eeeew, yes I went there – again!

How much should you aim for? A recent study showed how just 7 glasses a day is enough. That’s all!

It can be frustrating trying to remember to drink often. It doesn’t and shouldn’t be massive deluges of water drank once or twice a day, rather occasional sips. How do you remember to do that? How about attaching the new habit of taking a sip of water to an already established habit. Example: Every time you go to the kitchen, you drink a sip. Or, an easier solution I’m stealing from the book Fat Loss Happens Monday by Josh Hillis and Dan John; every time you take a sip of water from your bottle, take a second sip. It really can be that simple.

 

That’s all folks….

No more tips. Gosh, that ended up being somewhat longer than I had planned. If you got this far, well done, go eat something and take a drink of water.

 

The end bit!

If I had to reduce all of these into one statement, it would be this:

Take a serious look at your lifestyle habits and identify the weaknesses and then make rational and reasonable decisions to change one item at a time.

 

In the words of Mr Spock, ‘Live long and prosper’.

 

Jamie

Be a Smart Ass, not a Dumb Ass!

Righteo, the mega fun eating time has come to an end now that Christmas and the New Year is over. Not entirely of course, it’s still great to enjoy food a little, but balance must be restored… well, if you’re after a bit of fat loss it’s rather important now isn’t it!
Now, whilst many are running head first into chaotic, cataclysmic schemes involving expensive supplements, drinks, potions and ridiculous exercise plans, let us keep our heads whilst they lose theirs.
Be a Smart Ass, not a Dumb Ass!
Let’s put together a plan to actually get results. Now, I’m not going to propose any particular exercise plan as that’s far too personal for this post, but I am promoting the one habit rule.
Brains much smarter than mine have shown over and over again that focussing on working on one habit at a time is far more successful than the old cluster bomb attack.
So, let’s get into habit #1 for this week.
PLAN YOUR MEALS

“Sounds like a lot of work”, you’re perhaps thinking but all I’m suggesting is that for this week you make basic list of meals for every day. You probably already eat the same(ish) breakfast and probably only have some variety for lunches so just leaves evening meals.

So, what kind of meals should you list?

Don’t go all silly on us and try to be over complicated and uber-healthy, that’ll happen in time but try to come up with meals that:

  • Firstly, you enjoy eating.
  • That include a natural protein source like beef, chicken, fish, pork, legumes or eggs for example.
  • That include vegetables that you enjoy or at least tolerate!
  • Include flavouring from herbs or spices or a dressing.

 

After this, the recipes are whatever you like. Don’t expect yourself to be Heston Blumenthal, just list meals you enjoy with the criteria I listed above. You can repeat meals too.

This isn’t the end of the process, but by first acknowledging food, the following steps will be simpler and easier.

Next week, habit #2 of course … stay tuned for 6 weeks of habit building awesomeness.

Number 1 Key to Success

Now there’s an attention grabbing title!

However, I do have just that, one key thing to do in order to start the success process…

Number-1Whether you seek success in life, fitness, weight loss – in fact, anything you want to achieve, I would argue that the most important action is to “JUST SHOW UP.”

Many clients often ask something similar to, “How long does it take to…lose 5kg / knock 5 mins off my 5km run / eat better.” The answer is invariably always the same – start doing something.

I’m personally a terrible procrastinator. I’ll want to start a program but spend too much time pondering the details when all I’m doing is wasting time in starting the program. Another great example I’m sure my wife would agree with is finishing the new raised veggie patches. I want to do it but, I’m all, “yeah but, I’ve to go get the wood, level the ground, buy more stuff for drainage ….bla bla bla, I’ll do it tomorrow!”

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We all want something that’ll requires us to start doing something and it’s even easier to not do it. But, once we do actually start, we’re on the path to success.

Getting to the point. If you have something in your head, a goal, an outcome that you want to achieve, something you want to change, start to initiate that change with just one thing. The Just Show Up line can refer to actually making it to the gym or it could refer to writing out your dinner meal plans for the next day or two, heck, it could even be the simple act of writing your goal down on a note pad and leaving it next to your bed, computer, TV remote, whatever. Just start with something that points you in the direction you want to go.

Probably half my clients at FitStrong did procrastinate at some stage and left their health to play second fiddle to other things like work, partying, bringing up the family, or just procrastinated. At some stage something happened, usually unpleasant that made them decide to take action. Take pain, aches and a general feeling of being week, that’s a good motivator to change something. Their one thing was to look up a personal trainer on Google and I am very thankful that they got in touch with me.

So if you’ve been stuck in procrastination land for a while, contemplating change, I’d rather you acted now, grab your proverbial goals by the horns and just turn up for yourself.

If you’re ready to commit to change, maybe not sure what to do next, let me know below, let’s catch up over email and talk about how to get you started.

The Simplest Weight Control Method

Eatmove, and live better.

Precision Nutrition

Change your body, and your life, with personal coaching, support and guidance with the world’s leading nutrition coaching system and certified trainer, Jamie Hunter.

A large component of healthy and sustainable nutrition for weight loss, weight gain and sports performance lie in your eating habits.

If you’d like to take part and share in our upcoming workshops, or you would like to receive personal nutritional coaching, register on the form below.

How does nutrition coaching work?

Until recently, the process for helping people lose weight was a rather authoritarian procedure. A client would record a food journal and the coach would make a list of what’s wrong and what needs fixed, usually focusing on calorie restrictions and indeed, counting calories. Additionally, many systems would have followed diets, eliminating whole food groups in order to illicit a calorie deficit. Diet sheets would be given out with all the meals laid out for a week, missing whatever was required to be missing and including whatever was required to included.

precision-nutrition-food-labels-part-3-menu-caloriesThese systems may have worked for a limited time and are still very common place but, one element was ignored. Sustainability. What happens when the diet sheets get boring and or the client stops hiring the services of the coach? Old habits set in again without the knowledge of why and what should be done. I’m sure we’ve seen this kind of scenario in ourselves, family or colleagues. A fantastic weight loss followed by an un-welcomed weight regain!

A whole new system has arisen over the past 10 years and is only really gaining steam and recognition very recently. Precision Nutrition co-founder Dr John Berardi is perhaps the leading advocate of habit based nutrition coaching. Rather than forcing people to take action, he teaches habit based coaching that meets people where they are and guides them one step at a time towards letting new healthier nutrition habits set in. A new habit really can’t be forced into place, it has to be willingly accepted through small incremental, almost minuscule adjustments over a period of time.

The New Coaching Process

When a client starts nutrition coaching, the system commences with a few assessments to ascertain where the starting point is. This does include keeping a food journal in whatever form the client prefers. Photos, online submissions, google drive, hand written – whatever works. From here a realistic goal and time-frame is set and of course, why this goal is a goal. This is carried out in week one, maybe over a couple of sessions.

From here the coach works with the client to identify habits that limit making changes, habits that at some point need to be addressed to achieve the goal and then, from this list as it were, the most reasonable habit is worked on first. Only ONE habit at a time is worked on. This is a crucial point as taking on too many habits at any one time does lead to failure in most cases. The initial target is ONE goal per week or fortnight or longer and coach and client meet once per week for 45 minutes.

There are lots of other interim items that the coach and client work on, but the above outlines the coaching process in the simplest form to explain here.

Coaching programs

  • Available over 6, 10 or 14 weeks
  • Coach and client meet once per week for 45 minutes.
  • Tailored for individual needs and dietary preferences
  • NO COUNTING CALORIES!
  • Available in conjunction with personal exercise training

If you’d like to learn more, just register your interest below.

Register your interest below.

Georgie Fear – Getting Lean with 4 Habits

Start talking of diets and nutrition and it is evident that we are in an era of much confusion and the world of nutrition and what makes for healthy nutrition is becoming very hard to comprehend.

Enter Georgie Fear and her habit based approach to nutrition.

Georgie is a registered dietitian, professional nutrition coach and is author of Lean Habits. Scott Iardella interviews this passionate coach in this podcast.

Please listen in and also be sure to visit Georgie website www.askgeorgie.com

Enjoy this one and be sure to share with friends.

If you’re interested in learning more about habit based nutrition, please get in touch. This is what we do at FitStrong after-all.