Are you ‘Real-World’ Fit?

Does your exercise support real-world demands?

Much of the time people exercise to accomplish an outcome or even just for the sake of it, to burn energy, calories or time!

Whilst just working out is fine, wouldn’t it be awesome if our exercise endeavours actually prepared us for the physical needs of an active life?

Having bigger muscles might seem like an ideal, but really, when you’re getting old, no one will care how much you benched, how big your guns were or how many insta-likes you had. What really matters is how well you will function.

Can you balance, carry heavy ‘stuff’, climb, step up, crawl, run and jump? Can you get to the ground and back up effortlessly?

Strength training with machines, bars and dumbbells and kettlebells are great tools to build general strength, but they don’t always carry over to the real world apart from building general resiliency. The human skills to move and age with strength, power, purpose and fitness is something that takes a different form in the gym – if indeed a gym is even needed.

At FitStrong we practice all the usual strength exercises from squatting, deadlifting, pushes and pulls etc but we back these up with heaps of practice of natural movement, real world strength and fitness skills that will support you during the weekend gardening spree, house renovations, that big weekend hike and much more over the coming years.

If you’d like to chat about this and how it fits your lifestyle – let’s catch up.

I can design you and your family a routine I can take you through, or follow at home with any variety of things you may have lying around. Traditional gym equipment is not a requirement!

Even though restrictions are slowly being lifted, I am happy to meat virtually with video conferencing, in the park or of course, at my outdoor covered training area.

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Does exercise help reduce stress?

Part 2

In part 1 I talked about the whys behind my exercise. Today I delve into a great question.

As an escape from stressors, exercise definitely offers something to focus on. Because I often focus on the positives of training, I leave every session feeling better. Feeling good feels good – so finishing a training session feeling good can sometime continue for hours.

Previously though, a specialised focus on certain lifts whilst training for Powerlifting did sway the benefits away from feeling good. An overly specialised training program can push us further into distress and away from eustress. For that reason, I prefer not to program overly intensive or specialised routines for too long. 4 to 6 weeks, two to three times a years proves a suitable duration for the hard and heavy specialised programs while the rest of the year is used to develop well rounded generalisations.

Training hard in high stress periods is never a good idea if longevity is your goal. 

The science of course tells us that endorphins released during exercise makes us feel good. Whilst that’s true, it’s a similar statement to ‘eating makes us healthy’. But we know how that can go wrong.

 

Got any feedback or ideas? Please do get in touch.

Taking the Long Road

 

longevity

Most of us will be privileged to live on this earth for around 80 years or so, give or take a Zombie apocalypse or our politicians hitting the big red button in a temper-tantrum. The key word here is ‘live’. By live I mean to thrive, be strong, fit, healthy and absent of illness and disease. This is in contrast to just surviving which sadly we can observe in greater numbers in this, the 21st century.

While the great diseases of the 18th, 19th and early 20th century are all but non existent, we have growing number of people suffering heart conditions, diabetes, obesity and the cancers to name but a few.

This is not living – this is just surviving. 

We have a choice to lead a healthy life and these days we even have an abundance of resources and teachers who can guide us in the direction of a healthier life. It’s not actually that difficult once you decide to take ownership of your own existence; what you eat, what time you go to bed at and following a routine of exercise.

Living a monastic life void of all treats is not necessary but living a life of good, better and better(er) choices is achievable by everyone.

The simple choices can lead to many health benefits that in the long run, will add up to a better quality of life.

  1. Aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep a night.
  2. Eat mainly unprocessed foods comprising of proteins, healthy fats and carbohydrate foods that occur naturally.
  3. Walk every day for around 30 minutes. Not brisk. Just walk.
  4. Practice strength training 2 to 3 times a week.
  5. Daily, perform some form of stretching with a movement system you can enjoy. Just a few minutes a day can have wonderful affects.

You can choose to to just hang around until our nations health system has to take care us until death, or you take care of all the little things that add up to health longevity, living and thriving until our final day.

As my good friend Coach Steve Furys tag line goes – ‘Die Mighty’.

Steve Maxwell is another longtime coach with some wise words to share about longevity.

 

Got any thoughts?