Reboot Your Body Workshops

‘Learn to restore your body to factory settings with a simple collection of movements’

Walking around feeling stiff and achy is no fun.

Neither is it fun when you can’t play with the kids, look after the garden and go on holiday with an unhappy body.

Simply avoiding the physical things that cause discomfort is no long term solution and do you really want to feel terrible and incapable for the rest of your life??

The body was created to move, to be strong and resilient and yet, another truism is that life happens. Sitting behind a desk for years on end at school, then at work, collapsing onto the sofa at the end of the day and waiting for energy to find you are all just common lifestyle patterns that affect the majority of the population. It happens but we have got the choice to balance off these sedentary times with some great activities.

I don’t want to be like the majority and I intend to live a fit, strong and healthy life. Let’s sum that up as being resilient.

I don’t need to be the strongest or leanest person in town and you probably don’t need to be either, but we do need to be physically capable of doing some hard work and not getting knocked down for a few days afterwards.

Mobility Workshop 2019

At our Albany Creek gym we work on the skills of moving better first, covering all the fundamental movements our lives are designed to encompass. When we master those movements then we may add weight but first and foremost, we get really good at doing what humans are designed to do – move well.

In our ‘Reboot Your Body Workshop’ we revisit the movements that got us strong and resilient as children and use these to help us unlock our tight spots and tighten up our weak spots.

Our goal is not to point out the failings of the body but to help it unlock how to succeed at moving again.

The 2 hour workshop flows through a designed system and definitely does not entail huffing and puffing, or pain.

You may discover a few ‘ah ha’ moments as your body starts to ‘reboot’ and this is commonplace and an awesome experience to witness.

The movements aren’t magic or any woowoo stuff, just moves that help return your body to a less stiff and achy place.

If you’ve got questions – just ask below.

If you’re not local to Albany Creek however, I will be building the workshop content into an online project to follow in your own time.

 

Screen Shot 2019-04-12 at 8.03.27 am

Directs you to an Eventbrite page for the Workshops

 

Exercise is not a punishment for enjoying food and drink

Monday is always a great day to ….

You can fill in the blank word or words but how often does this happen? A big weekend followed by a big Monday plan that goes – well, I’m sure you know how that story turns out.

Here are a few thoughts floating around my head after some chit-chats with different people over the last week.

  • Exercise is for developing better movement, getting stronger and fitter, having fun and feeling great afterwards.
  • Exercise will help you live longer with more physical independence and wellbeing.
  • Don’t confuse exercising with weight loss.
  • More is not more in most cases.
  • Make exercise fun but safe.
  • How much food you eat is the only factor that will help you lose body fat or build muscle.
  • Better sleep and stress management will make it easier to manage your eating.
  • In any combination, variation or cultural persuasion, eat vegetables, proteins, natural fats and enough carbohydrates with a sprinkling of flavoursome herbs and spices as preferred.
  • Experiment to see what works best for you.
  • Make eating fun but in limitation.
  • Be a reasonable adult.
  • If you miss a training session or have a big splurge on a Saturday – don’t compensate by ‘smashing out’ a gym session or ‘hard dieting’. Just pick up where you left on and continue life.

Got any thoughts to add to this? Let me know.

Need to book in for more details chat about this? Get me below.

Jamie

Exercise for the Over 50s

Put away your slippers and forget that advert on the TV for the retirement village because the fountain of youth is very much within your grasp. It always is and always will be.

Okay, so yes, age has a cruel way of catching up on some people but in most cases only because it’s let to happen. You read that correctly – It’s a choice to allow age to slow us down.

Maybe it’s the assumption that we are meant to stop moving as much as we get on a bit or maybe it’s laziness aka too tired or maybe it’s the ‘I’m too busy to exercise’ like exercise to stay fit, strong and mobile is a luxury we choose to avail of.

Copy of Beechtown Market

Physical ageing is very much a choice we make. Being fit, strong and mobile is a choice we have… an easy choice actually.

Your body has been created to last your whole life and adding knowledge and wisdom to the equation adds to your strength of being and character too.

We are meant to be strong, mobile and capable at 80, much like we are in our 20s. No, that’s not a pretentious or lofty statement but very much a reflection of what can happen if we choose to be active throughout our lives.

At FitStrong we have a small group class designed for the over 50s. Believe it or not we work on all the movements those in their 30s work on. We squat, carry out pushing and pulling movements, carry weights and lift things up and put them back down again. I’m not going into details as we do regress these and progress them as and when needed.

However, the elements that culminates in the greatest successes is the ‘other stuff’ we practice.

These elements are taught at the Original Strength workshops by Tim Anderson and the team and after first experiencing in them in 2015 I realised that these movements and practices (yes I’ll get to them in a moment) really are the missing links in adult exercise and we’ve all done them before… back when we wore smaller clothing and watched Tom and Jerry on the little TV in the corner.

Yep, how we moved when we were children was how we developed into stronger, fit and agile young adults and we were meant to continue that process of living actively. But, high school, college, university, that 9-5 job and everything that we piled onto our schedule kind of shoved the exercise into the, ‘must do when I’ve got time’ list of chores!

But, moving well and staying strong is not a chore, it’s how we are made. Denying our body these stimulations leads us down the road to frailty, unable to bend over without pain, never mind touch our toes or run up a flight of stairs.

The big 5 movement categories that we did as children also reinvigorate or reset adults. Just like hitting Ctrl, Alt, Del on your keyboard to reset your frail computer, resetting our bodies can allow us to slowly regain more youthful movement, strength, agility and overall fitness.

The big 5 movement categories?

Simple. If you spend any time watching the kids move around when toddlers, you’ll have noticed how they lead every movement with that big head of theirs, despite it being considerably heavy compared to the rest of them. They rolled from their front to their backs and vice versa. They rocked until they discovered crawling which ultimately lead to getting upright and without an athletic coach, discovered how to climb, walk and run. You’ll maybe have noticed how they didn’t actually suck in their guts. They actually used their abdominals to breath… the way we are all meant to.

The 5 movements:

  1. Breath Abdominally
  2. Move our head around with control
  3. Roll on the floor (rotate our bodies)
  4. Rocking on all fours (move into deep hip positions like squatting down)
  5. Crawl (use our four limbs to move in a gait pattern, left leg, right arm move together etc)

What Adults don’t do so well?

  1. Breath Abdominally. Many adults chest breath as a result of fatigue and stress.
  2. Move their heads. Many adults complain of stiff necks and an ability to look up, over their shoulders or even tuck the chin into the neck accompanied by frequent head aches.
  3. Rotate. Not quite rolling on the floor but it’s the same movement pattern. The ability to segment our lower from upper body in movement is a vital ability.
  4. Get into a squat position. How many adults can rest in a squat position? Sadly not many due to tight hips, ankles and knees.
  5. Whilst adults do not travel on all fours like toddlers and babies, crawling taught us gait movements. Yet again, many adults fail to move well when walking, jogging and running. It should be smooth, proud and comfortable. However, watch people out walking around, running and such and you’ll see activities that far from resemble smooth, proud and comfortable.

Ooh, let’s break the doom and gloom theme of that last section. Our bodies are wonderfully created and have the capacity to rebuild and ‘reset’ to its former glory.

Getting stronger, fitter, healthier all start with getting back to basics and doing these often and doing them well. It doesn’t need to be a military bootcamp session either.

Walk, look around you beyond the screen of your smart phone, stopping sucking in your stomach, don’t avoid the stairs and probably most importantly, get down to the floor… and yes, get back up again and consider checking out how well you do move. See below.

Coincidently, many under 50s are benefiting from practicing these resets too. Maybe being younger, the feeling of losing some mobility is a new and unpleasant experience compared to those who have lived with being stiff as planks for years on end.

Do I need these resets? 

I don’t like standards in general as they attempt to generalise qualities but, the following are movements we should be able to do without discomfort in the absence of any recent injury or trauma.

  1. Reach your arms fully overhead without arching your back. Can you stand, back against a wall and reach your arms overhead to touch the wall without taking your back off the wall?
  2. Sit into a resting squat. Can you bend your knees and squat down so to rest?
  3. Touch your toes. Can you keep your legs straight and hinge over to touch at least the bottom of your shin?
  4. Can you stand on one leg and balance for 10 seconds?
  5. Look behind you. Can you stand upright and rotate through your neck and shoulder girdle to see behind you?

Just 5 standards. Did you answer Yes to all? If so, clap yourself on your own back as a big well done – mmmm, and if you can’t do that then maybe read on. Just read on anyway!

If you answered No to any of these, you have a need to address your mobility issues. Indeed, a lacking in any of these qualities can result in aches, pain and injury. These qualities are simple, given human movements we can encounter in any given scenario. How about a quick look over our shoulder and ouch, a neck muscle spasm? How about dropping your phone or something and quickly trying to catch it and ouch? How about scrubbing the bath tub and pulling a back muscle?

These few examples are actual stories from clients I have worked with. Thankfully they are all fine specimens now.

Where am I going with this (longer than expected) blog post?

I am so passionate about helping people to move better so that they can live a strong and mobile life that I want to share the programs I run. I’ve lived in pain in the past and that forms one of my ‘Whys’ in my business practice. I really don’t want to see other people living in pain when they can in most cases* allow their bodies to fix themselves.

What I want to share

30 Minute Discovery Sessions

It’s hard to plan how to get to point B in a strength and wellness plan if we don’t know where point A is.

The 30 minute discovery session offers an opportunity to discover your starting point, discuss goals, concerns and leave the session with a clearer direction in mind.

The session includes:

  • Movement screen to see how well your body moves.
  • Goal Discussion.
  • Clarity on what direction you could take next to achieve your goal.
  • Answers. An opportunity to ask all the questions you have.

How to start? Fill in the contact form below.

Private Sessions

The next step towards your goal is following a step-by-step training program. Our programs are designed rather than just random workouts. Training sessions in the gym focus on building up movement skills, learning how use that wonderful body to press reset, and slowly say goodbye aches and pains. Repetition is key to success in every endeavour and especially so in physical wellbeing. To help gel new habits we’ll agree upon suitable homework tasks.

Ready to take control? Fill in the contact form below.

Mobility Workshops

Over the cooler months of May to October I will be running a series of workshops that will help you learn how to reset your movements, help you find ways to move better so that you can pursue other physical goals or simply to help you get on with life without those niggles.

Dates and times to be confirmed but get onto the early bird list here.

 

If there is anything you would like to know, please do get in touch. I am here to help.

Jamie

 

 

*Yes, in most cases general stiffness can be self addressed but in some cases when really neglected, muscle tension needs to be encouraged by the skilled hands of a therapist. I know some of the best in the Brisbane area and am happy to share their details – just ask.

Best Training When Stressed!!!

I’ll never shy away from sharing my love of my family, especially my daughter. She’s the smart one who will support me in my old age, you know, spotting me when doing handstands.

Anyhow, this morning on our way to school she brought up the subject of stress and asked how people should exercise to manage stress. She’s got exams and homework and is starting to get exposed to the kind of baseline stress we all live with. I went on to explain how there is normal every day stress and then those times when we get too stressed, and then balanced off by anti-stress, the things that make us feel good or relaxed.

This got me thinking afterwards about all the times adults want to exercise out their life stresses – is this really the best way to deal with high stress situations?

Before watching the video, here are a few terms for you to read:

  • Baseline stress is all the average, everyday stress we live with and accept. Bills, work, stuck in traffic, cold, heat, regular exercise, the final moments of your weekly dose of Game of Thrones and the silly argument over who forgot to buy the beetroot and almond dip and stuff like that.
  • Stress and excess stress results in a hormonal response in the body that releases more cortisol and epinephrine – the stress hormones that fuel us for fight or flight. This is referred to the Sympathetic nervous system response.
  • Anti-stress or the opposite of high stress is relaxing, chilled out and happy. This is the Parasympathetic nervous system kicking in.

We need to have exposure to both of these to develop as fully capable humans. Indeed, without exercise stress we would not be able to progress, to get fitter, stronger and more intelligent. As a species we have thrived on a finely tuned balance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

However, when we expose ourselves to too much stress, things go wrong. We get sick. High stress exercise is the last thing we need to add to our lives when we are stressed. Whilst carrying out the basics of our normal exercise routine is fine, adding more exercise stress in the form of high intensity intervals can be a ticking time bomb on our physiology.

Adding relaxing, resetting practices to our exercise schedule is a must during periods of above baseline stress.

We choose the Original Strength movement system as a way to reset our bodies prior to training in the gym and on recovery days but if you like the idea of yoga, gentle walking or listening to your chilliest of your music collection, do that.

That’ll do me for today. I look forward to my daughters next question but if you have any questions or wonders, please do ask.

Jamie

Thoracic Spine Mobility Tip

Moving better and getting stronger is rather contextual. For an average gym attendee it’s a clear message; “I want to lift heavier stuff” or “I want to carry out more complex movements”.

But, if you’re an individual with back pain (or any pain) at rest, whilst carrying out day-to-day activities or whilst trying to engage in exercise, the message is different. It becomes qualitative rather than quantitive. Working out hard or following the most advanced, cutting edge, progressive strength training plan is irrelevant at this stage.  Getting out of pain and discomfort is top priority.

Most of the general population will have some form of mobility issue. It could be as simple as a slightly stiff ankle or hip or shoulders none of which seriously affects the quality of life or it could be as impactful to cause pain and discomfort.

One area of mobility impairment I observe in the gym is thoracic spine mobility restrictions, or in simple terms, the limited range of movement of the upper body through rotation or side bending and also overhead reaching activities.

The thoracic spine (aka the T-spine) comprises the 12 vertebra that covers the shoulders to the waist, or the rib cage portion of the torso.

If the thoracic spine has restrictions, the lower backs lumbar spine will compensate and attempt to move more, not something it’s meant to do. This can often result in fatigue, pain and discomfort. Where I see the restrictions more often is at the top end, where the neck and shoulders take on more work and become stiff, tired and strained. Essentially when the upper torso doesn’t move well, the arms end up compensating and over-reach. There is indeed plenty of research that supports the theory that thoracic spine movement dysfunction is linked to pathologies and pain in the neck, shoulder, and elbow (Heneghan et al, 2017).

Thankfully there are systems in place to help rectify this the help of health practitioners and some trainers who may have qualifications in postural restoration – and positive outcomes can be quick. One study showed that after just three weeks of thoracic spine mobility and strength exercise practice, that participants improved movement competency, strength, posture and pain relief.

Today I’d like to share a couple of T-spine mobility drills we practice often but with a couple of tips added to help make the most of them. We are only human and oftentimes we’ll try to cheat, or get a bit complacent. My modified versions of two common drills have helped many clients actually get the benefit of the moves.

 

Have a go and see how you feel but naturally, of you’ve got pain, maybe go see your local physiotherapist for personalised guidance.

Jamie

How to Bulletproof Your Future

Part 1

Screen Shot 2018-09-20 at 1.04.21 pm

In the gym it’s pretty obvious how we spend our time. People turn up, we warm up, we do some strength work and movement skill work, have a chit-chat then say our ‘see you next times’.

The why and the what else is all-too-often not discussed in much detail apart from some passing suggestions about getting in some aerobic work and keeping up some stretching at home etc.

This year, my goal is to help people bulletproof their futures. 

I’d love to be offering a proverbial radioactive spider to help turn you into a superhero version of yourself, and actually, compared to to an alternative, I might be doing just that!

This year I will naturally be spending time espousing the benefits of strength and mobility training, because that what 90% of my gym time with people is spent doing. BUT, I am going to be spending more time promoting the other stuff, the things we probably do not spend enough time promoting.

My role is that of a health and fitness promoter, not just a personal trainer. Fitness is what most of trainers spend lots of time on but health… meh, we could be doing heaps better at that.

Our bodies maintain a healthy balanced system when it’s treated as intended. It’s a bit like a bike chain. Left unused it will rust, stiffen and eventually fail when used. Our bodies have a blueprint, a design and a purpose. There are a number of things we are meant to do daily and frequently to sustain the balance.

Let’s look at these briefly. I will be spending time over the coming weeks looking more deeply into these according to what research has found and I’ll cover to how to action improvements.

  • Sleep 7 to 9 hours a day.
  • Eat a balanced diet of plants, proteins, fats and water too.
  • Stay strong in all the movements our mechanics perform in.
  • Walk daily and get out of breath from time to time.
  • Move well and often without restriction, pain or discomfort.

What happens when we drift away from our intend? We specialise. This is a subject that puts the cat right amongst the pigeons.

Whilst admiring a specialist and their very particular set of skills, they have most likely sacrificed many other essential elements of what makes up complete health. 

A few general examples:

  • The cyclist who does not work on their strength training
  • The powerlifter who neglects their body fat levels and aerobic health
  • The overly busy father who works 55 hours a week yet neglects his family
  • The very busy mum who focuses entirely on her children and family and neglects their own fitness and nutrition
  • The Gymnast who focuses wholeheartedly on their sport and sacrifices their joint health

While you can admire all these people for their dedication and successes, isn’t it a shame they sacrifice to do so. It’s not a moral shame either. It’s a shame that the essential physical components that make us fully operational humans are missing. Being mobile, strong, aerobically capable; being able to fully recover from each day with good nutrition and adequate sleep is what amounts to enable our bodies to thrive. Being good at one thing is fine, but the pay-off is a health trade-off. 

2019 is the year I’ll be wearing more of my health promotion hat and not just my PT hat. So much of my last 10 years have been spent on learning and developing better knowledge and application of training programs, exercises, progressions, regressions and systems but one thing has become quite apparent – it just doesn’t matter if we are not getting the basics of health in place.

If you’re following a training program, not getting stronger, not losing fat, not feeling fitter, most likely it’s not the training that’s to blame, it’s the poor attention given to these other components. 

Before contemplating becoming an expert or a specialist, weigh up being a really good generalist. Being able to undertake a wide array of components of being human is so much more wealthy than being awesome at one or a restricted number of things. 

Until next time, do weigh yourself up. What are you doing more of or what are you doing proportionately less? Consider that list above:

  • Sleep 7 to 9 hours a day.
  • Eat a balanced diet of plants, proteins, fats and water too.
  • Stay strong in all the movements our mechanics perform in.
  • Walk daily and get out of breath from time to time.
  • Move well and often without restriction, pain or discomfort.

 

Part 2 – Sleep 

 

Getting Back to Old Fashioned Health Values

Attaining optimal physical health in the year 2018 is probably a little bit confusing. Do short-cuts exist? Can you hack a boost with a magical coffee and fasting for 3 days? Is there a wonder food? Is there one exercise that’ll do the job and is strength training all you need to lead a wonderful and fulfilling life allowing you to thrive into old age with grace and all your human facets in place?

If anyone tells you ‘just need ____’, they are most likely full of cr@p!

To get a grasp of how and what is means to lead an optimally, healthy life as a human, you need to grasp what it means to be an optimally, healthy human. What is our system designed to do?

Thankfully the impartial and unbiased side of the medical and sports science world has outlined this for us on numerous occasions. We’ll delve into this later on.

For the purposes of physical health, strength, wellbeing and seeing results from training, I like to focus on the following areas:

  • Recovery
  • Nutrition
  • Cardiovascular exercise
  • Resistance exercise
  • Movement practice

Here’s a wee infographic I’m working on. Eventually it will have links to resources for each area.

Screen Shot 2018-09-20 at 1.04.21 pm

For a very long time (until recently) people have included the above ‘agenda’ in their lives out of lifestyle necessity.

Until the 1950s and 1960s people had lifestyles that promoted:

  • moving more than sitting,
  • activities that kept them strong,
  • eating mostly unprocessed foods,
  • sleeping a good 7 to 8 hours rather than binge watching TV until they fell asleep.

Standards and values of basic human performance have dropped dramatically. Waist inches have climbed and even though we are living longer, we are just delaying death rather than prolonging life. Let’s read that last sentence again.

Waist inches have climbed and even though we are living longer, we are just delaying death rather than prolonging life.

There is no doubt that we will never return to a lifestyle that demands more physical living unless war and famine dictates it!

If you value old fashioned physical standards of health, attaining a good balance of physical living, what do you need to do?

At the start of the blog I mentioned that medical and sport science has informed us what we need to do. Let’s recap on what is promoted:

Sleep: 7 – 8 hours is optimal despite the fact that some people tell you that 5 hours is all they need.

Nutrition: No diets are required. Just aim to gradually reduce processed foods and meals and snacks and instead target fruits and vegetables that are in season NOW. Three to four fist sized portions a day. Eat unprocessed sources of protein, roughly the same size of 2 to 3 palm sizes. Eat unprocessed (read – natural) sources of carbohydrates like rice, potatoes and other root vegetables. Roughly 2 to 3 palm fulls a day. More information from Precision Nutrition. 

Cardiovascular: The targets have been made clear. Walk 30 to 90 minutes a day. You do not have to get seriously out breath, just get up and walk for at least 30 accumulated minutes a day. Simple really. Once this standard is met, then an additional 2 higher intensity sessions can be added a week – 30 minutes of effort that take you pulse to 180 – your age. Not flat-out death chasing stuff! Read more here.

Resistance Training: Two to three times a week undertake a strength training program that includes all the essential human movements. These are the most common physical movements we are required to perform and designed to perform frequently. These can be labelled as Squatting, Pushing, Pulling, Bracing (our torso), Hinging / Bending at the hips and Carrying weight. A well structured plan can be simple and undertaken in as little as 20 to 30 minutes. Need a hand, just ask.

Movement Practice: This is probably one area that should increase compared to strength training as we age. As a goal now, if you spend 30 minutes strength training, you should spend up to an hour on a movement practice. What do I mean movement practice? Yoga, Animal Flow, Original Strength, whatever flexibility techniques you like but in any case, you gotta get looser. As we age our hips, biceps, chest, hamstrings and other areas develop and hold onto more tension due to fatigue, posture, lifestyle. Stretch, move – get all loosey-goosey.

Building this into a week as a beginner

  • Walk every day for 30 minutes (3.5 hours a week)
  • Strength Train twice a week for 30 minutes (1 hour a week)
  • Stretch / Get Mobile 4 times a week for 30 minutes (2 hours a week)
  • Start a habit of eating mostly natural foods
  • Sleep every day for 7 to 8 hours

Yes, you read that right. Exercising for 6 ½ hours is essential for a beginner. Any less and you really are leaving a lot on the table. Any less and your lifestyle will be underpowered to assist you into old age.

It’s a serious matter but think of it this way. Do you want to spend the final years of your life in assisted aged care, unable to clean your own bum or do you want to thrive until your dying day.

To quote Steve “Coach Fury” Holiner, ‘Live Long, Be Strong, Die Mighty’! 

I know I’ve laid out a handful of information here. If you want to start to thrive now and you’re not sure where to start, get in touch and I will happily steer you in the right direction. Not a sales pitch, I just want to help.

 

 

Let talk briefly about stretching

Warning: this is not a jargon filled post with sprinkles of science. It is based however on evidence based practice.

photo-output

First off, I’m not going to bash stretching. I’m going to suggest a better way for most people to initiate a stretch that will last longer and improve muscle and movement range.

Most people who stretch use a static stretch. A position is assumed and held for 10 seconds to over a minute. But, many will report no lasting affect and indeed when returning to the same stretch again, they’d be back where they where in the previous stretch session.

Why? Therapists much smarter than I would inform you that no lasting stretch is achieved because the static stretch affects the muscle and the local nerves but not the brain. (Simplest description I dare write) The stretches benefits will last only a short time.

Simply put, the act of stretching the muscle for a period informs the nerve of no further threat and in course, the nerve allows the muscle to relax. However, no learning or adaption will be incurred without the message going to the brain. Intent movement initiated by the brain telling the nerves what to do are learned reflexes. We develop these as babies, toddlers and onwards.

As much as intentional strength activities cause a learned adaptation, the same applies to progressing a muscles range of movement or mobility or flexibility.

So how we do get our brains involved in a stretch? We move into brief moments of muscular stretch with intent. You intentionally move your muscles to take you into the stretch albeit briefly.

There are a few methods that utilise a therapist helping you to tense and release muscles, you can also do this yourself ‘or’ you can just move and have fun.

I prefer the latter.

This wee video below is not a technical demonstration. The rules are simple, briefly move into a hamstring stretching position (in this case) while moving around into and out of various mobility drills or positions you are familiar with. Heck, you can make up moves. It doesn’t have to look pretty or flowing – just move.

Number one rule though, use muscles to pull and push and manoeuvre you into each position to feel a light stretch and do not go to pain.

 

Final word. If you like stretching and it makes you feel better then do it. Make it a frequent practice. I did for years until I found an alternative that helps me achieve some of the physical activities I want to pursue.

Got any feedback, just fire a message off below.

Quick Recovery Tip

Recovery days may raise the notion that’s it’s a day for total rest, like feet up, don’t move and conserve energy.

Well, in actuality, ‘active moving’ recovery is a far superior recovery method AND preparation method for your next training session.

As well as mobilising our joints, preparing wholesome meals, sleeping a good 7 1/2 to 8 hours is vital too.

Today I just want to share a quick active recovery routine I follow in between my harder days.

Increased blood flow to remove post exercise toxins, joint mobility and regaining muscle elasticity are some of benefits but rather than write it…. here’s a video.

You can follow along to it too 😁

Simplest hack to boost your gym results

What’s the best hack to getting results Jamie?

I get frequent and some very awesome questions from both in-person personal training and online clients. One common query surrounds hacks. A shortcut to good ol fashioned time, patience oh, and putting in the hard yards.

I get asked about oils, shakes, best carbs, food timing, supplements, exercise routines, recovery methods for enhanced performance and recovery … all except one extraordinarily simple thing we do every day. This one thing for the most part, we don’t do very well but once improved, really can be a powerful performance enhancer in all aspects of our life.

Drum Roll… Sleep more.

We’ve all experienced those foggy days after waking up prematurely perhaps, or maybe after a late night or an interrupted nights slumber owing to a feisty family of possums who have been practicing their Irish dancing on your roof! This latter fits the description of my last 4 nights … sigh, yawn!

We all know we probably should sleep more, shooting for those recommended 7 to 8 hours a night. Yeah, I know, you’ve probably claimed at some time to do just fine on 5 hours a night like Elon Musk or Donald Trump who claims to sleep 4-5 hours a night and maybe you are one of those rare individuals who claim the same. However, the vast majority of people need 7 to 8 hours of clean sleep per night to recover and rejuvenate.

Contrary to what some say about getting used to reduced sleep periods, the body still needs the 7 to 8 hours+ to sequence a series of bodily processes to recover from the previous day and especially if you exercise frequently and expect to see results.

Board-certified sleep medicine doctor and neurologist W. Christopher Winter, M.D., of Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine, and author of the upcoming book, The Sleep Solution, says if it takes you about 10 to 15 minutes to conk out, you only get up once or twice at night, and you wake up before your alarm, you’re sleeping at the right level of efficiency – especially if you feel well-rested throughout the day. “You’re really looking for that happy medium.”

As for conditioning yourself to reduced sleep, If you’re falling asleep as soon as your head hits the pillow or while relaxing in front of the TV in the evening, chances are you’re not getting enough sleep though. It is a fine balance.

So, yes, getting those 7 to 8 hours is a balance you get to experiment with but happens during sleep that’s so important for all you exercisers?

stages of sleep

A brief look at the stages of sleep

1.

  • Between being awake and falling asleep
  • Light sleep

2.

  • Onset of sleep
  • Becoming disengaged from surroundings
  • Breathing and heart rate are regular
  • Body temperature drops (so sleeping in a cool room is helpful)

3.

  • Deepest and most restorative sleep
  • Blood pressure drops
  • Breathing becomes slower
  • Muscles are relaxed
  • Blood supply to muscles increases
  • Tissue growth and repair occurs
  • Energy is restored
  • Hormones are released, such as: Growth hormone, essential for growth and development, including muscle development
  • Provides energy to brain and body
  • Supports daytime performance

You can see the list of benefits of stage 3 and do you think we’re helping ourselves by missing out on these? Can we really recover from our training and work if we’re missing out on essential snooze time?

IMG_4985

Maybe keep track of your sleep over the next few nights, note what time you go to bed at assuming you’re not drifting off on the sofa and of course note what time you wake at. If you’re feeling under par during the and getting less than 7 hours sleep, perhaps it’s time to address what time you go to bed at.

On that note, I’ll stop here so you can plan your bed time – oh, and maybe investigate turning off blue light devices and changing your smart devices night mode to the orange back light.

 

Night night

IMG_BD2A256EB4CA-1

Good any thoughts? Drop me a note if you’d like.